Bakers and Breadmakers

Traditional mills are the vital link between farmers and bakers. The recent upsurge of interest in home baking and small artisan bakeries is largely thanks to the pioneering work of the Real Bread Campaign, in promoting and raising awareness of the poor nutritional quality of much bread made using the fast Chorleywood process. The Guild works closely with the RBC and has been quick to point out that you can’t make good bread without good flour, and that stoneground flour is generally more tasty and nutritious than roller milled flour.

Some of our Guild mills have tearooms and associated bakeries, and some offer bread-making courses themselves or work closely with bakers who run bread-making courses – for example Cann Mills in Dorset work with Panary; Swaffham Prior Windmill works with Carl Schavitz; Maud Foster Windmill supplies the The School of Artisan Food at Welbeck near Nottingham; and Little Salkeld Watermill offers its own courses.

Many of our Mills supply flour to specialist, artisan and local bakeries, and work with them to develop new breads and baking methods designed to get the best from our flours, for example by using slow fermentation, sourdoughs, and sponge methods.

The Oxford Bread Group has pioneered the rediscovery of some heritage varieties of wheat, and is exploring how best these can be grown, milled and baked, and what their advantages and qualities might be.

Bread related websites include:

  • Virtuous Bread, a pioneering initiative by bread enthusiast Jane Mason
  • Bakery Bits, a great place for specialist equipment, materials and flours for making bread.
  • Dan Lepard’s website is well worth a visit with links to his latest recipes published in The Guardian, as well as information on his new books.
  • Bread Matters, established by Andrew Whitley, who has written a book of the same name, offers a range of bread-making courses and other information on making good bread.
  • Brockwell Bake pioneered the rediscovery of some heritage varieties of wheat, and is continuing to explore how best these can be grown, milled and baked, and what their advantages and qualities might be.

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